Bryant House | Photo © 2011 Bullet, www.abandonedfl.com

This home was demolished on June 27, 2016 and up until then, there wasn’t much history known about it and what was known was false. Thanks to Janette Campbell, there is finally some proper history I can add here.

Frederick Edward Bryant emigrated from England in 1894 to study agricultural methods in New Mexico and owned a dairy in Colorado with his brother, Harold J. Bryant. After visiting Florida in 1908, F.E. Bryant became interested in developing agriculture in the Everglades. The brothers started the Palm Beach Farms Company, which developed the Lake Worth Drainage District which would later become the cities of Lake Worth and Greenacres.

How it looked in 1991, by then it was owned by Jeanne McFadden and her husband.
How it looked in 1991, by then it was owned by Jeanne McFadden and her husband.

During World War I, the shortage of sugar renewed Bryant’s interest in the Everglades, and he convinced the U.S. Department of Agriculture to build a sugarcane breeding station at Canal Point. Bryant and G.T. Anderson started Florida Sugar and Food Products Company and built the first sugar mill in the Glades in 1921. To raise capital, they merged their business with the Southern Sugar Company.

Southern Sugar began failing financially in 1931, until General Motors Corporation started the United States Sugar Corporation and took over Southern Sugar Corporation.

Built in 1934, it is thought that this was F.E. Bryant’s home. His wife and daughters weren’t fond of living there and enjoyed the social scene in West Palm Beach, so they moved out. The house was kept as a guest house for visitors who had come to see his sugar mill. Due to this, it is also possible that the house is older than what records show.

There was 2-story apartment with an attached garage located behind the house. According to Janette Campbell, Some of the older residents of the area have referred to it as the “honeymoon cottage” because of the number of young newlywed couples who began married life there. Perhaps Mr. Bryant had it built to provide a temporary residence for visitors because of the remoteness of the area at that time before he moved out. During the 1980s, the garage was converted to another rental space.

Bryant House | Photo © 2011 Bullet, www.abandonedfl.com

Jeanne McFadden moved into the house sometime in the 1950s with her husband, and they were supposedly the third owners of the property. She passed away on October 11, 2009 in Miami at the age of 99. By then, the home was in disrepair due to damages from Hurricane Wilma.

In 2011, the property was taken over by the United State Government and as I had written before, it was demolished on June 27, 2016. According to some commentators, a USDA office will replace it.







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